Covid-19 Updates

The latest from UNC Greensboro

Revised 8.31.20 to remove questions specific to Spring 2020 semester and old information

Revised 9.2.20 to add questions relating to COVID-19 testing, case count, and quarantine & isolation.

General Questions

Is the University closed?

The University remains open and operational with appropriate measures to protect the health of the community. Face coverings are required to be worn inside at all times, and outside when proper social distancing cannot be maintained.

How has the university responded to the pandemic?
  • During our initial response to the virus,  we activated our Emergency Management Action plan, led by our talented emergency management staff. 
  • We have built on that foundation to create a structure that helps us to ensure that we have the latest information, can share that information across campus, can make well-informed decisions (quickly if need be), can monitor the status of the virus on our campus and in our community, and can ensure we are taking the appropriate actions to safeguard our employees and students.  This structure consists of a series of working groups led by individuals with critical expertise. These groups come together routinely to ensure coordination across the campus, and several members of the senior leadership team participate in these meetings as well.    
  • We have close partnerships with our local public health department and county emergency management office.  Our student health staff participate in briefings by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and closely collaborate with their peers at our sister UNC institutions.  
  • Our Director of Environmental Health and Safety stays updated on recommendations regarding cleaning protocols and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and works closely with our facilities and housekeeping staff to ensure we are following best practices.
  • We have created a comprehensive COVID-19 website that we continually update with fall 2020 semester information and more.
  • We have created a Keep Teaching website to support faculty as they navigate the virtual teaching world.  
  • We have created a Keep Learning website to support students as they navigate the virtual learning world. 
  • We have created a Keep Working website to support staff as they navigate the virtual working world. 
  • The offices that provide direct student support (e.g., Admissions, Financial Aid, the Registrar’s Office, Students First) are still doing so by phone, email, texting, and other virtual means.  
What are the main points of North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper’s most recent COVID-19 executive order as they relate to UNCG?
  • Face coverings must be worn indoors if anyone else is in that space who is not a member of the same household.
  • Face coverings must be worn outdoors if it is not possible to consistently be physically distant by more than six feet from non-household members. 
  • People must wear face voverings while exercising if they are either outdoors and within six feet of someone who does not reside in the exercising person’s household; or indoors and not within their own home. 
  • All workers and guests of fitness and physical activity facilities must wear face coverings when they are inside the establishment.  
  • Face coverings are encouraged, but not required for professional or collegiate athletes if (1) they are strenuously exercising or recovering from exercise and (2) those athletes are training for or participating in a sport that is under the oversight of a league, association, or other organizers that required teams and players to follow a protocol for reducing risk from COVID-19. These athletes must wear face coverings, including on the sidelines and in practice, at any time that they are not strenuously exercising or recovering from recent exercise.   
  • Child care facilities, day camps, and overnight camps must have workers, all other adults, and children five (5) years or older on-site wear face coverings unless an exception applies. 
  • Law enforcement may cite those who do not wear a face covering in a situation where a face covering is required under the executive order, if an exception to the face covering requirement does not apply.
What does it mean to move into Phase 3?

On September 30, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced that would move into Phase 3 of its pandemic recovery plan, effective Oct. 2, 2020 at 5:00pm.

UNCG is choosing to maintain our current limits — 10 people indoors, 25 people outdoors for social gatherings (not including activities related to instruction or those otherwise regulated by specific guidelines in the governor’s executive orders). We want to ensure we take the most prudent approach to managing the virus. 

Further, the Chancellor’s previous guidance on eliminating use of campus facilities for external events for the duration of the fall semester remains in effect. Facilities will be available for internal use only. We believe this is necessary in order to promote social distancing, limit density, avoid additional complexity related to contact tracing, conserve both cleaning and community protective equipment supplies for mission-critical activities, and avoid taxing our housekeeping and facilities staff during an already busy time.

Similar decisions have been made by many other colleges and universities both in the UNC System and in Guilford County. It remains clear that large gatherings put the health of our community and our ability to continue to provide face-to-face instruction at risk. We are working to enforce our standards and rules against gatherings across campus. This requires everyone to participate and share responsibility. Don’t host large events. Don’t go to large events. UNCG police and Greensboro police will continue enforcing the governor’s orders. Violations of these orders are criminal offenses and subject to disciplinary action under the Student Code of Conduct. Employees who do not adhere to our community standards may also be subject to disciplinary action. 

We appreciate that students are starting to help us identify problem areas and anticipate gatherings. We need your help. If you have concerns about a rumored event or party, please report it to our COVID-19 Incident form: go.uncg.edu/covidconcern

Updated 10.2.20 for Phase 3 information

COVID-19 Testing FAQ

Are there any confirmed cases of coronavirus on campus?

A case count is available here. The data is updated daily. UNCG may add additional data and detail to this dashboard as the semester progresses.

We are taking all reasonable precautions on our campus and in our community to best promote the health and safety of our campus community. We are working closely with Guilford County Public Health officials to ensure notifications are made quickly to those who may have come in contact with the student so they can be directed as to their next steps.

It is important that students, faculty, and staff, whether on campus or off, continue to monitor their own health and take appropriate social distancing measures. This is vital to slowing the spread of the virus and protecting the most vulnerable in our community.

Where does the data on your case count dashboard come from? 

Our Emergency Management team gathers data, manages contact tracing, and monitors the status of all cases that affect our campus.

UNCG is using an emergency management tool that was specifically designed for these kinds of events with sophisticated capabilities that enable us to summarize and create reports for internal monitoring purposes of our cases in multiple ways – by location, affinity group, class, isolation/quarantine status, etc. We update our summary dashboard daily, Monday-Friday. Prior to the daily update, the Emergency Management Team does a manual review to ensure that the numbers are accurate. Guilford County Public Health also reviews our data to monitor the number of positive cases and assist when possible with contact tracing.  

This case management system receives information from four sources: self-reportsStudent Health Services, and local public health agencies, and surveillance testing. Students, faculty, staff, and contractors are asked to inform us when they have COVID-like symptoms, have tested positive for COVID-19, or have been identified as a close contact of someone who has tested positive.

Student Health Services automatically inputs positive test results from students who seek care through their office into the case management system. When local public health agencies become aware through their case investigation that an individual who has tested positive has a connection to our campus, they alert the University, and that case is entered into our case management system. 

When there are multiple entries related to the same case (e.g., a student self-reports and Student Health creates a report), the entries are linked as one case. The case management system allows us to update cases as new information becomes available. It also allows us to track positive cases that occur among students or employees who are in proximity to each other (e.g., through living or learning environment, work environment, affinity group) and determine if and when, in conjunction with Guilford County Public Health, a group of cases should be defined and reported as a cluster.  

Why do you not report the number of tests conducted by student health or the positivity rate on your dashboard

UNCG Student Health has only been testing symptomatic individuals and their close contacts.  This does not provide a representative sample of our campus population, nor would the percentage of positive tests from this group provide a relevant data point as it relates to the prevalence of virus in the larger community.  Therefore this specific data would not be helpful in providing members of our community with information that can accurately and effectively inform any decision-making

How is contact tracing handled? How is the University notifying people of possible exposure?

As previously communicated, we have an active, thorough contact tracing process and are in regular contact with county health officials as needed. When an individual (student or employee) has tested positive for COVID-19, UNCG staff will conduct an interview with that individual to determine exposure possibilities such as class schedule, work colleagues, and so on. With that knowledge, the University will ask close contacts of the individual on campus to quarantine. Other measures, such as intensified cleaning of potentially affected areas, will also be initiated.

For contact tracing to work, participants must be thorough and honest. We ask all in our community to do their part. Failure to provide honest, accurate information can fuel the spread of COVID-19 and make more people sick.

UNCG will conduct contact tracing to identify and notify close contacts within the UNCG community, and share this information with Guilford County Public Health. Individuals who test positive will also be contacted by Guilford County Public Health for a more comprehensive case investigation interview and to identify those in the larger community who may have been exposed.  

Updated 9.2.20

What is the CDC’s guidance on testing for institutes of higher education?

Per the CDC guidelines, institutes of higher education (IHE) vary considerably in geographic location, size, and structure. As such, university officials should determine, in collaboration with state and local health officials, whether to implement any testing strategy, and if so, how to best do so.

When testing might be needed:

The CDC describes these scenarios when universities may need to conduct SARS-CoV-2 viral testing for students, faculty, or staff, though ultimate determinations for such a test rest with IHEs in consultation with local health officials:

  • Testing individuals with signs or symptoms consistent with COVID-19
  • Testing asymptomatic individuals with recent known or suspected exposure to SARS-CoV-2 to control transmission

Testing individuals with signs or symptoms consistent with COVID-19

Consistent with CDC’s recommendations, individuals with COVID-19 signs or symptoms should be referred to a healthcare provider for evaluation on whether testing is needed. In some locations, individuals can also visit their state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.

One strategy to identify individuals with COVID-19 signs or symptoms is to conduct daily symptom screening such as temperature screening and/or symptom checking for students, faculty, and staff. However, because symptom screenings are not helpful for identification of individuals with COVID-19 who may be asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic, symptom screening alone will not prevent all individuals with COVID-19 from entering the IHE.

IHE administrators and healthcare providers should immediately separate students, faculty, or staff with COVID-19 symptoms by providing distance learning options, isolation rooms in dormitories or other housing facilities, and providing alternative food service arrangements for those who live on campus. As part of symptom screenings, IHEs should be prepared to refer symptomatic individuals to an appropriate health care provider who will determine when viral testing for SARS-CoV-2 is appropriate.

IHEs can encourage individuals with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to go to their place of residence, a designated isolation housing location (if living on-campus), or a healthcare facility depending on how severe their symptoms are, and follow CDC guidance for caring for oneself. IHEs can also encourage individuals to watch for emergency symptoms and seek emergency medical care if these symptoms occur.

Testing asymptomatic individuals with recent known or suspected exposure to a person with COVID-19

Testing is recommended for all close contacts of persons diagnosed with COVID-19:

  • Because of the potential for asymptomatic and/or pre-symptomatic transmission, it is important that contacts of individuals diagnosed with COVID-19 be quickly identified and tested. Feasibility of identifying and testing close contacts will likely vary by IHE and their local context.
  • Additionally, in accordance with state and local laws and regulations, IHEs should work with local health officials to inform those who have had close contact with a person diagnosed with COVID-19 to wear cloth face coverings if they are able, quarantine in their living quarters or a designated housing location, and self-monitor for symptoms for 14 days.

In some settings, broader testing, beyond close contacts, is recommended as a part of a strategy to control transmission of SARS-CoV-2:

  • In IHEs, residence halls, laboratory facilities, and lecture rooms may be settings with the potential for rapid and pervasive spread of the virus.
  • Expanded testing might include testing of all people who were in proximity of an individual confirmed to have COVID-19 (e.g., those who shared communal spaces or bathrooms), or testing all individuals within a shared setting (e.g., testing all residents on a floor or an entire residence hall). Testing in these situations can be helpful because in high density settings it can be particularly challenging to accurately identify everyone who had close contact with an individual confirmed to have COVID-19. For example, students who do not know each other could potentially be close contacts if they are both in a shared communal space.
  • IHEs might want to consider that some people are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19. Everyone is at risk for getting COVID-19 if they are exposed to the virus, but some people are more likely than others to become severely ill, which means that they may require hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator to help them breathe, or they may even die.
  • Decisions about the level of risk and the scope of testing should be made in coordination with state, territorial, Tribal, and local health officials.

Testing asymptomatic individuals without known exposure to a person with COVID-19

Testing of all students, faculty and staff for COVID-19 before allowing campus entry (entry testing) has not been systematically studied. It is unknown if entry testing in IHEs provides any additional reduction in person-to-person transmission of the virus beyond what would be expected with implementation of other infection preventive measures (e.g., social distancing, cloth face covering, hand washing, enhanced cleaning and disinfection). Therefore, CDC does not recommend entry testing of all returning students, faculty, and staff.  

Why isn’t UNCG testing everyone who comes to campus to see if they have the virus?

There are two reasons we are not conducting mass testing of people who do not have COVID-related symptoms.  

The first has to do with the nature of the testing process itself.  

There are two types of tests that we currently use to determine whether a person has an active infection of  SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19):

  1. PCR (polymerise chain reaction) tests look for pieces of the virus in a sample taken from an individual’s nasal/throat area.  In most cases, the sample is taken by a health care provider and then sent to a lab with specialized equipment to conduct the test.  The time it takes to receive a test result depends on the volume of testing being conducted at the lab at any given point in time.  We have seen this range from 24 hours to 10 days.  There is a rapid PCR test, but it is currently prioritized for use in hospital settings.  PCR testing is the gold standard.  
  1. Antigen tests look for pieces of protein (antigens) that are part of the virus.  There is a rapid antigen test which is conducted by the health care provider in their office.  However, antigen tests are less accurate than PCR tests.  A negative result from an antigen test has to be confirmed by conducting a PCR test.    

Test results from either type of test only provide a ‘snapshot’ in time.  Even with the gold standard PCR test, an individual could be exposed to the virus, test negative, and then develop an active infection from that prior exposure a day or two later.  This is because it takes a certain amount of time for enough of the virus to be present in the sample for it to be detected.  

Given this, getting a negative test result only means that, at the time that the sample was taken (which could have been days before depending on timing), the individual did not have an active infection.  But, it’s easy for a negative test result to give people a false sense of security, particularly when they have no symptoms and feel just fine.  

One approach to that challenge would be to routinely test everyone.  That approach is extremely challenging for many logistical and practical reasons.  At this point in time, it is simply not feasible, as our region is struggling to maintain both the supply of testing materials and the lab capacity to return results quickly that are needed for testing of symptomatic and high risk individuals.  Individuals in those groups must be given priority so they can treat them appropriately.

For these reasons and others, the CDC and American College Health Association do not currently recommend mass testing of people who do not have symptoms as a ‘screening’ tool.

How can students get tested?

UNCG students can be tested for COVID-19 at Student Health Services. Students should call Student Health Services at 336-334-5340 to schedule an appointment with a provider to determine if testing is indicated.

As of September 2nd, UNCG is expanding testing for asymptomatic individuals to help us identify potential areas of risk related to the presence of COVID-19 on our campus. More information on these testing clinics targeted towards different, potentially high-risk populations in our campus community is available here.

Updated 9.2.20

How can I report that I have tested positive for COVID-19, am experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, or have been in contact with someone with COVID-19?

UNCG has created a process for students, faculty, and staff to self report COVID-19 cases. If you experience COVID-19 symptoms, test positive for COVID-19 (or a health care provider tells you that you are presumed positive), or if someone in your immediate household tests positive, please notify the university by filling out the form at go.uncg.edu/selfreport. This procedure is voluntary, and the information submitted will be shared only with limited University officials  to make a determination if additional cleaning and other response actions need to be taken on campus. Employees should also notify their supervisor and contact Human Resources regarding eligibility for COVID-19 leave provisions that are currently in effect. Please note that completing the form does not serve as notification to your supervisor that you are not available for work.  

If you do not have internet access at the time which you need to report your case, Students should call 336-334-3129 and employees should call 336-334-5009 to complete the report.

What happens to students who are exposed to a known case of COVID-19 or who become ill?

Following guidelines from Guilford County Public Health and recommendations from the CDC, students who are exposed to a known case of COVID-19 or who become ill will be asked to return home.

If a student is unable to travel or has other extenuating circumstances, UNCG has established 148 rooms appropriate for isolation or quarantine as needed on campus, and a protocol is in place to support them.

How is quarantine and isolation being handled by the University?

Individuals who have been potentially exposed to a person who has tested positive and are at-risk for contracting the virus will be notified through the University’s contact tracing procedures and provided with further guidance.  As needed, any affected individuals will be placed in quarantine or isolation.  

Quarantine keeps someone who was in close contact with a person who has tested positive with COVID-19 away from others. Isolation keeps someone who has symptoms and/or tested positive (with or without symptoms) away from others, even others in their home. For more information on the differences between quarantine and isolation, view this sheet. Students may quarantine or isolate on- or off-campus. UNCG has established 148 on-campus rooms appropriate for isolation or quarantine as needed.   

The available rooms and usage percentage are tracked on our COVID-19 Dashboard. These rooms are single rooms with a private bath, with the exception of situations where students from the same room, suite, or apartment may be able to quarantine together in a shared space. We support these students by delivering food and other supplies, checking on them frequently, and monitoring their symptoms. 

Should students break their quarantine or isolation, they will be subject to the Student Code of Conduct. Employees may also be subject to disciplinary action should they fail to comply with quarantine and isolation directives.

For employees, our case management system will send an automatic email to the employee and the supervisor on the individual’s last day of quarantine. Employees must have documentation from a public health or medical professional that they are cleared to return to work.

Similarly, students will receive a similar email on their last day of quarantine, and must be cleared by a public health or medical official to return to campus activities. 

Where is UNCG housing students in quarantine or isolation?  How many rooms are available?

UNCG currently has 148 rooms available for students who test positive or show symptoms of COVID-19 and need to be isolated or are determined to be a close contact of someone who has tested positive and must be quarantined.  The available rooms and usage percentage are tracked and reported 3 times per week (Monday/Wednesday/Friday) on our COVID-19 Dashboard. These rooms are single rooms with a private bath, with the exception of situations where students from the same room, suite, or apartment may be able to quarantine together in a shared space. These rooms are located in several residence halls across campus.  In many instances, there are floors or wings of residence halls designated for this purpose. 

Students are given strict instructions to remain in their rooms.  We support these students by delivering food and other supplies, checking on them frequently, and monitoring their symptoms. Should students break their quarantine or isolation, they will be subject to the Student Code of Conduct. 

This approach has been reviewed with Guilford County Health officials.  Because students in quarantine or isolation are prevented from having close contact with others, this approach does not present any increased risk to other residents or members of our campus community. In adherence to FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) and HIPPA (Health Information Portability and Accountability Act) regulations, we cannot provide any additional detail on the location of quarantine and isolation rooms or identify students who may be using these resources. 

As stated by the CDC and others, because individuals with COVID-19 may not show any symptoms even when they are contagious, the best approach is to act as if you personally and everyone with whom you may be in contact could have the virus and practice the appropriate safety measures — wearing a face covering, social distancing, and hand washing. 

As a UNCG employee, how can I protect myself and others? What if I feel sick or test positive?

Every day, before coming to work, you should screen yourself for COVID-19 symptoms and check your temperature. If you experience COVID-19 symptoms or do not feel well for any reason, you should not report to work. Instead, you should call your primary care provider and notify your supervisor. If you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, you should complete the COVID-19 Self Reporting Form. This procedure is voluntary, and the information submitted will be shared only with limited University officials  to make a determination if additional cleaning and other response actions need to be taken on campus. Employees should also notify their supervisor and contact Human Resources regarding eligibility for COVID-19 leave provisions that are currently in effect. Please note that completing the form does not serve as notification to your supervisor that you are not available for work.  

Employees who are symptomatic or test positive and are in isolation should work with their healthcare providers to monitor their progress. Employees must meet the criteria specified by the CDC prior to returning to campus for work. Once an individual believes he or she has met the criteria for coming out of isolation, they must provide documentation from a health official confirming that they meet the criteria and can return to the workplace and campus activities. Supervisors will receive an email from HR or Faculty Personnel Service.

If you do not have internet access at the time which you need to report your case, employees should call 336-334-5009 to complete the report.

I’m a supervisor, and someone in my unit has tested positive for COVID-19, has reported that they have COVID-19 symptoms, or has reported that they might have had close contact to someone with the virus. What should I do?

UNCG has created a process for supervisors to report positive COVID-19 cases reported within their units. If an employee reports that they have COVID-19 symptoms, has tested positive for COVID-19, or someone in their immediate household has tested positive, supervisors are to report that information by filling out the form at go.uncg.edu/supervisorreport.

Information submitted will be shared only with limited University officials  to make a determination if additional cleaning and other response actions need to be taken on campus. Supervisors should also refer employees to the Human Resources Department to determine eligibility for COVID-19 leave provisions.

How can an employee get tested?

Employees can seek testing through their primary care provider or from one of the community testing sites established. Testing is also available through select pharmacies. Student Health Services is not conducting COVID-19 testing for employees.

To find a community testing site employees can visit: 

If you would like to be tested in Guilford County at a community testing site, you should call 336-641-7527 to schedule a COVID-19 testing appointment with Guilford County Public Health.  

As of September 2nd, UNCG is expanding testing for asymptomatic individuals to help us identify potential areas of risk related to the presence of COVID-19 on our campus. More information on these testing clinics targeted towards different, potentially high-risk populations in our campus community is available here.

There are opportunities for asymptomatic employees to get tested. Details are communicated directly to faculty and staff via email.

Updated 9.22.20

Fall 2020 FAQ

What is the UNC System and UNCG position on possible housing and dining refunds should students be forced to vacate residence halls or services are suspended this year due to COVID-19?

We know there have been many questions about dining and housing refunds if students are compelled to leave campus or facilities close due to COVID-19 issues this year. We regret any concern or confusion this has caused. As of July 23, the UNC System has addressed the overall policy on this topic for all UNC System universities with the following guidance.


“As we are all working to be ready to provide in-person instruction and on campus experiences for our students, we are also preparing for the contingencies that the COVID-19 crisis may require us to address.  We cannot predict if some or all instructional formats for all or part of the 2020-21 academic year may change due to the public health emergency caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. As has always been the case, tuition and fees are charged at the beginning of the semester and will remain in place regardless of any changes in instructional format. Tuition and fees directly impact our ability to provide meaningful educational programs, experiences, and services and will not be refunded in the event that instructional format changes for any part of the 2020-21 academic year.”

If UNCG is able to find ways to offer financial relief – in the form of refunds or other measures – to support our students, we will do so.  Further, we remain fully committed to our priority of helping students who might not otherwise have stable environments to return to (for example, in the Spring when we had to close most residence halls, we were able to offer an exception for students with the greatest need to remain on campus and to help other students without financial means to return home safely).  This is consistent with UNCG’s statement from June 23, 2020.

Updated July 23, 2020

What is UNC System policy and UNCG plan related to student fees this fall in light of COVID-19?

FULL UNCG Tuition and Fee Position

Educating and supporting students at UNCG is financed in four ways: tuition, fees, state appropriations, and philanthropic donations. These funds make it possible to provide all of the academic programs, student support (like advising, tutoring, and physical and mental health services), campus safety initiatives and resources, campus experiences, artistic and creative events, wellness activities, athletic activities and events, and community resources that our students and our community expects.   

UNCG is consistently ranked very highly when compared to many other public universities in terms of access, affordability, and value (or “bang for the buck”) thanks to our relatively low tuition, especially for the 90+% of our students who come from North Carolina. The relatively low tuition rates for in-state students are made possible because the North Carolina legislature provides additional funding in the form of state appropriations or tax dollars to reduce tuition and fee expense. But tuition and appropriations only pay for some of what happens in our classrooms and on our campus. 

For us to fully meet our commitment to our students and the citizens of North Carolina to provide a quality education, world-class research, a vibrant student experience, and meaningful services to our community, additional funding is necessary. As is true for most universities, we have particular fees that help us meet those needs. Even in “normal” times, fees are required for the university to function even when people are not on campus or particular services are not in use.

Nationally, the average student fees for a public, doctoral university like UNCG exceed $11,000.  At UNCG for the 2020-2021 academic year, fees for full-time undergraduates in on-campus degree programs will be just over $7,400. All universities in the UNC System submit their proposed fee structure and dollar amounts first to their campus Board of Trustees and then the UNC Board of Governors for approval. Per UNC System policy, the proposals must be informed by student and faculty feedback.  

Fees are established through an extensive, collaborative process that includes administrators, Staff and Faculty Senate representatives, senior executives at the University, and perhaps most importantly, a diverse group of student leaders who represent different student populations (Student Government, undergraduates and graduates, residential and commuter).

Required student fees support programs, services, and facilities on campus and online for which state funds are not available and/or cannot be used. Fees are necessary to serve our students while they are here, and they help us protect, maintain, and operate our campus even when they are not. Even more, in these immensely challenging times, we must develop and implement a wide range of systems and programs to support students in new ways and ensure when things do return to something more normal, we are ready and able to provide students with what they deserve and expect from UNCG.  

All of our students, except for those in programs that are formally designated as “distance learning,” will continue to have access to facilities, programs, and services this fall either on campus or virtually regardless of their particular mix of classes (face-to-face, hybrid, or online), although clearly there may be limitations based on public health considerations and mandates. Details here.

UNCG exists to provide education to our students and propel them into meaningful lives with career and socioeconomic advancement potential. UNCG does not make a profit, and we invest everything we can into the service of our students and our community. Put another way, when any of the sources of funding are cut, reduced, or lost, there are real and significant impacts to our ability to deliver access, excellence, and impact for our students and the greater North Carolina community. Facilities may close, academic programs may be cancelled, and people may lose jobs. This is a sobering but very real component of our current highly complex situation. 

Every institution in the UNC System—and therefore every administrator, faculty member, parent, student, and individual whose livelihood depends on our universities—is facing massive uncertainty this fall. We know that all of you in our community have unique pressures, concerns, and conditions that impact how you are approaching the semester. Because there is so much complexity, the UNC System has provided guidance to every institution about fees and tuition as follows:

“As we are all working to be ready to provide in-person instruction and on campus experiences for our students, we are also preparing for the contingencies that the COVID-19 crisis may require us to address.  We cannot predict if some or all instructional formats for all or part of the 2020-21 academic year may change due to the public health emergency caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. As has always been the case, tuition and fees are charged at the beginning of the semester and will remain in place regardless of any changes in instructional format. Tuition and fees directly impact our ability to provide meaningful educational programs, experiences, and services and will not be refunded in the event that instructional format changes for any part of the 2020-21 academic year.”  Note: In case of another major disaster, the University will follow UNC System Office refunding guidelines.

The only way for us to plan for the year, operate to the best of our ability, deliver the quality academic experience you demand, and ensure that we remain open and operational when we emerge from the current public health crisis is to manage our financial situation across the System consistently in this manner. We have and continue to share your feedback and your concerns. We understand them. Our goal here is to be transparent with how our financial operations work and what you are paying for when you come to UNCG. Details on specific use of fees is below.

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Fee Details

The fees for full-time Undergraduate students (twelve hours or more) enrolled in on-campus degree programs for Fall 2020 are below. Fee schedules for part-times students, students in on-line programs, and graduate students can be found here

  • Student Activities Fee – $288.50
    • This fee supports Campus Activities & Programs (Including student organizations and the Campus Activities Board), Campus Recreation, Elliott University Center, Equipment Replacement, Facilities Maintenance (for non-academic and non-administrative facilities), Spartan Card Center, Leadership & Civic Engagement, Intercultural Engagement, the Student Government Association and Media Board.
    • Even with the changed and limitations imposed by our response to COVID-19, all of these Student Affairs departments (Campus Activities & Programs, Recreation & Wellness, the Elliott University Center, Leadership & Civic Engagement, Intercultural Engagement) have and will continue to provide virtual and a limited in-person program and service delivery throughout the pandemic. Student organizations will still have access to funding to support their own initiatives.  The Elliott University Center, Spartan Card Center, and Facilities Maintenance will continue to be in operation. 
  • ASG Fee – $1
    • This supports UNCG’s participation in the UNC Association of Student Governments, which is a student-led organization committed to furthering educational opportunities and advocating for all students within the University of North Carolina system. The UNC ASG has and will continue to meet virtually during this time of social distancing and will have discretion to use their funds to support students in the System. 
  • Athletics Fee – $390
    • This supports UNCG’s Division I intercollegiate athletics program of 17 men’s and women’s sports, which are essential not only to the on-campus experience, but to engagement with our community, driving visibility and positive perception of the University nationally, engaging with alumni and donors who support all aspects of UNCG, and providing an important economic and cultural asset to our region.
    • This fee also supports UNCG spirit groups — cheer, dance, and band. It includes the maintenance of athletic facilities including shared spaces with Campus Recreation & Academics (such as our tennis courts and lighted field).  It enables free admission for students to all regular season home athletics events including men’s basketball at the Greensboro Coliseum.  
    • Most importantly, this fee funds scholarships for student-athletes as well as joint creation and funding of internships in partnership with academic programs (Kinesiology, Nutrition, and Media Studies).
    • It helps cover athletics operational costs, including but not limited to: coaches, team travel, recruiting activities, game operations, payment to officials for games, equipment and uniforms, strength, conditioning and athletic training, live streaming of events.
    • The fee covers 85% of the athletics budget. The remainder is from NCAA distributions (which are being reduced), multi-media rights, trademark licensing and fundraising.  
  • Student Facilities Fee/Debt Service Fee – $353.50
    • This pays for debt incurred on capital projects which cannot be built using state funds. For example: UNCG’s soccer and baseball stadiums, the Leonard J. Kaplan Center for Wellness, the Elliott University Center renovation, and the Anna M. Gove Student Health Center expansion/renovation. This fee does not pay for parking facilities and residence halls, which are funded by users of those facilities.
  • Education & Technology Fee – $230.50
    • This supports course materials and supplies like lab equipment. It also provides partial support of information technology (like wired and wireless networks) for student class and out-of-class use—both highly critical during this time of increased distance learning. This fee has helped us equip virtually every learning space with new distance learning technology this summer to support the expansion of online and hybrid courses.
  • Transportation Fee – $53
    • This covers UNCG students’ portion of the HEAT (Higher Education Area Transit). HEAT is the City of Greensboro’s university and college-based public transportation system. Students may ride any HEAT or GTA (Greensboro Transit Authority) local bus fare-free with their UNCG ID card. In addition, this fee supports the Spartan Chariot campus transportation shuttle system (Weekday Loop, Spartan Village Express, and the Evening Safety Shuttle) which operates during the fall and spring semesters. The shuttle serves to provide the campus with efficient and safe campus transportation, reduce vehicular congestion and decrease the demand for proximity parking.
    • All public transportation, including the Spartan Chariot, are still in operation with reduced seating to maintain social distancing.
  • Security Fee – $15
    • This fee is mandated by UNC General Administration to fund campus security initiatives. This fee supports campus safety initiatives, including the LiveSafe app and the Student Ranger and Safe Walk programs. It also helps support substance abuse counseling services.
  • Health Services Fee – $155
    • This supports health, counseling, and wellness services at the Anna M. Gove Student Health Center. Services include: primary medical care, women’s health, blood pressure checks, immunizations, allergy injections, flu shots, laboratory and digital x-ray, psychiatric care, pharmacy services, nurse clinic, sports medicine, counseling services, and wellness/health education programs. The Medical Center continues to provide in-person and telemedicine services for students, although appointments must be made via phone rather than walk-in. The Clinic has and will continue to provide COVID testing for students.The Counseling Center continues to provide telemental health through virtual appointments and a variety of virtual group and workshop options. The Counseling Center also provides a 24-hour/7-days per week line for any students who are in crisis or know someone experiencing one. 
  • New Student Fee – $112 Transfer/$254 Freshmen 
    • The New Student Fee is a one-time assessment that covers costs related to new student and first year experience programs, including Spartan Orientation, Advising, and Registration (SOAR), new student onboarding sessions, Rawkin’ Welcome Weeks, Spartan Spears, Your First Year, First Finals Fest, Second Year Launch, as well as first year and transfer student honoraries Alpha Lambda Delta and Tau Sigma. The new student fee also covers student staff wages, UNCG promotional items provided to new students, as well as the design and production of printed and multimedia materials.

NOTE:

Online students pay (per credit hour)
Ed & Tech Fee $15.57
ASG Fee $.03
Security Fee $1.01
Online Service Center $20.00
Registration Fee $6.00 (per semester)

Is wearing a face covering required?

Yes. Because COVID-19 is spread through droplets when an infected person speaks, coughs, or sneezes, one of the most important tools we have in this fight are face coverings. Following CDC guidance, and per the newly issued statement by the UNC System, we have modified our expectations for faculty, staff, and students and will make face coverings mandatory at UNCG, effective immediately.  

Every faculty and staff member and student must wear a face covering that covers their nose and mouth while indoors – including in classrooms, libraries, auditoriums, and meeting spaces. These may be cloth/reusable or disposable. Employees may remove their face coverings when in their individual offices. Face coverings are also required outdoors in situations where appropriate social distancing cannot be maintained. Students, faculty, and staff are required to have a face covering with them whenever they are on campus. We are also requiring visitors and guests to honor our efforts to keep our campus community safe; as such, these policies apply to all visitors, vendors, and independent contractors.   

Face coverings will be provided to faculty and staff as previously communicated; employees who have questions about how to obtain face coverings should speak with their department head/chair or supervisor. UNCG also will provide students with face coverings. Face covering distribution information is available here. Individuals – employees and students – may also use their own face coverings, provided they meet CDC guidelines and, for employees, are appropriate for the workplace.   

This novel virus has forced all of us to adopt new patterns of behavior that are sometimes awkward and uncomfortable. We need to work together to reinforce the importance of engaging in all of the behaviors we know prevent the spread of the virus – handwashing, staying home when ill, social distancing, wearing face coverings, and showing we care about each other by doing what is right to help fight COVID-19.  
We are relying on members of our community to adhere to these standards, but when necessary, we also will enforce these behaviors. This will include asking students who do not have a face covering to leave the classroom, campus building, or other venue and only return when they have a face covering. Students who continue to violate this policy may be subject to further action per the Student Code of Conduct. Similarly, employees who do not wear a face covering may be subject to disciplinary action based on our policies regarding employee performance and behaviors in the workplace.   

A task force of faculty, staff, and students is currently exploring the appropriate mechanisms for implementing, reinforcing, and enforcing this important mandate and will provide further details in the near future.  

Students who seek an exception to this policy because they are unable to wear a face covering due to a medical condition should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources and Services (OARS); employees with a similar request should contact their HR business partner.  Exceptions may be made on a case by case basis to facilitate teaching and learning in specific environments. 

In addition to requiring face coverings, we have many other protocols in place to address the health of our students and employees, including:

  • All students and employees are to monitor themselves for symptoms prior to coming to work or the classroom.
  • Student Health Services is providing telemedicine services to reduce the potential for exposure during in-person office visits.
  • Testing is available for students through Student Health Services and for employees through their health care provider and community-based clinics. Students and employees are asked to use a self-reporting tool if they are ill and/or have been tested. 
  • These self-reports feed into a case tracking tool to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the contact tracing and case management process. 
Where can I get a face covering?

Available beginning August 17, 2020

Visit our stations for free face coverings and helpful tips to stay safe during COVID. Sponsored by Division of Student Affairs and the Environment Health & Safety department.

Long term locations:

  • 1100 W Market Street 100F
  • 326 Tate Street Front Office
  • 812 Lilly Avenue Office
  • 996 Spring Garden Street Departmental Library
  • Admissions and Visitor Center Front Desk
  • Brown Building 209
  • Coleman 323
  • Coleman 401
  • Curry 324
  • Eberhart Psychology Lobby 
  • Office of Intercultural Engagement (EUC 62)
  • Elliott University Center Information Desk
  • Foust 105
  • Foust 207
  • Gatewood Studio Arts Building 102
  • Gatewood Studio Arts Building 138
  • Graham 237
  • Graham 337
  • Kaplan Center Front Desk
  • McNutt ITS Walk-In Center
  • MHRA 2319
  • MHRA 3119
  • MHRA First Floor 1103-1115
  • Mossman Front Desk
  • Music Library Front Desk
  • Petty 116
  • Police Station Front Desk
  • School of Education 310 (Teaching Resource Center)
  • Spring Garden Apartments 150 (Military Affiliated Services)
  • Stone 345
  • Sullivan Science 346
  • Taylor Theatre 202

Reusable UNCG branded face coverings will be available for purchase at the campus bookstore.

How will the face mask requirement be enforced on campus?

All individuals are required to wear face coverings in classrooms, lecture halls, and any other instructional areas and indoor campus locations, as well as outside when social distancing is not possible. We have done a lot of educational outreach to students prior to them returning to campus, so thus far we are seeing strong compliance as students are starting to return. Students who are not properly wearing a face covering will be asked to leave the classroom or office location, and they may return when they are wearing a face covering.

We have multiple locations where students are able to pick up face coverings free of charge. For the safety of the community, faculty and staff have the right to ask a student to leave a classroom or office when a student is not wearing a face covering. Every classroom is equipped with personal protective equipment for faculty and students, including disposable masks, hand sanitizer, wipes and socially distanced seating arrangements.

What disciplinary action will students face for violating the face mask requirement?

Our main priority is to have compliance rather than taking disciplinary measures. However, on the first occurrence of a student not wearing a face covering, the instructor will address the student  and either provide a face covering then, or suggest the student go pick one up at one of the distribution stations on campus. At the second occurrence of a student not wearing a face covering, faculty will address the student and also complete a concerning behavior incident reporting form, which prompts the Dean of Students Office to initiate outreach and have a conversation with the student. The third occurrence, or any occurrence in which a student blatantly refuses to wear a face covering will prompt review for a formal conduct response by the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities.

How is information about the face mask requirement (including disciplinary action for violations) being conveyed to students?

UNCG continues to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic in a manner that promotes the safety of employees, students, and campus visitors, while furthering the University’s mission and values. The University has proactively communicated by telephone, text, email, across social media platforms, with video messages, instructional displays, and on-campus signage, and reinforced in the syllabi language for all courses. We continue to work directly with our public health partners, and UNCG served as a COVID-19 testing site in cooperation with Cone Health, who operates the largest hospital system in our region.

Information about the face covering policy was sent via email to all faculty, staff and students prior to it being a state mandate, and it was included in UNCG’s Return to Campus Guidebook that was also shared with all students. The handbook and policy are both included on the University’s COVID-19 website, and signage regarding face covering requirements is posted throughout campus facilities. This information was also shared with residential students in additional emails from Housing and Residence Life. Information about properly wearing a face covering (over the nose and mouth) has been widely shared on University social media accounts, and it is also posted on our website, on external signage on walkways, hallways in buildings, elevators, bathrooms, and other public-facing areas of campus. 

25,000 disposable face masks were provided to Housing & Residence Life for our residential students. Beginning August 17, students will be able to pick up disposable masks from several locations on campus. 96,000 of these masks will be available when classes begin, with another 105,000 set to arrive in September.

What will the Fall 2020 semester calendar look like?

As of July 7, we have adjusted our academic calendar to minimize mass student travel during the semester and reduce spread of the virus. 

  • Classes started on August 18 as previously scheduled. 
  • We have eliminated Fall Break and the formal Reading Day.
  • The last day of class will be the Tuesday before Thanksgiving (November 24). Most final exams will be held online.
  • This adjusted calendar contains the same number of instructional days as the prior calendar.  
How are classes being handled?

Course Delivery
In order to maximize schedule flexibility, practice social distancing in our learning spaces, and ensure in-person access as much as possible, classes are being delivered using a variety of methods: in-person, online, and a hybrid of both. Our efforts include:

  • Improving our capabilities to provide more, and better, online learning experiences and support services. 
  • Investing in a sophisticated new video platform that allows recording, webcasting, and video content management for distance learning in virtually every learning space on campus.
  • Shifting nearly 900 sections that were originally scheduled as face-to-face to online; restructuring another 1,250+ sections to a hybrid format.
  • Reducing the time some students spend face-to-face in the classroom by as much as two-thirds. 

We want students and families to have choices based on their needs and preferences. More details about hybrid courses are available here.  

Classroom Changes
We have made a range of physical adjustments to classroom settings, including:

  • All in-person classes are socially distanced, with all participants wearing face coverings. 
  • Classrooms and hallways are cleaned intensively and frequently. 
  • Students are able to maintain distancing in our shuttles on the way to and from classes. 
  • Managing traffic in hallways and staggering the way people enter and leave classrooms.
  • Providing other physical protections and barriers where appropriate, adding hand sanitizer stations, etc.

Update as of Sept. 2nd:

A tremendous amount of work went into reconfiguring classrooms this summer to create more distance between students, and between students and faculty, and to reconfigure course sections and reassign classrooms accordingly. As guidance has evolved and needs have become more clearly identified, we have engaged in the process of locating larger classrooms for the approximately 135 course sections that were at, or close to, their maximum capacity. In addition, our team has located larger classrooms at the request of faculty for specific classes and we will continue to make every effort to be flexible with space as needed. Also, as previously stated, our facilities team has assessed the ventilation in all buildings, cleaned filters, and set air circulation systems to support our health and safety efforts.  More info available here.

How is housing be handled?

Housing & Residence Life has implemented new precautions and policies in residence halls including:

  • Changing the move-in process to a two-stage approach (a drop-off stage and a final move stage)
  • Adjusting guest visitation policy to limit visitors.
  • Increased cleaning in common areas.

For students who plan to live on campus: 

  • Any new or returning resident who didn’t not feel comfortable living on campus given the unique circumstances, the changes made for the health and safety of residents, or the 2020-21 Housing Contract Addendum, should have canceled planned housing in ARTEMIS by July 17. We will refund the $200 pre-payment and you will not be charged any cancellation fees.   
  • On July 2, 2020, UNCG received guidance from the UNC System related to potential housing and dining refunds should campus operations be interrupted as they were in the Spring. While we cannot predict what the mandates around health and safety might be, consistent with this System guidance and our own statement from June 23, we will always work with our students to find ways to help should adverse situations arise. We know this is a stressful and uncertain time.  We are dedicated to finding ways to support our students and their families and ease these potential burdens as much as possible.  If UNCG is able to offer financial relief – in the form of refunds or other measures – to support our students, we will do so.  Further, we remain fully committed to our priority of helping students who might not otherwise have stable environments to return to (for example, in the Spring when we had to close most residence halls, we were able to offer an exception for students with the greatest need to remain on campus and to help other students without financial means to return home safely).   

 Visit Housing and Residence Life’s Coronavirus information page.

How will UNCG keep the community safe?

It will take all of us together to keep our community safe and healthy. The primary way COVID-19 spreads is through person-to-person contact, so our best hope of preventing its spread is by changing the way we behave. We will expect students to show care for their friends, peers, colleagues, and neighbors. This means students, staff, faculty, and campus visitors are required to wear a face covering when inside at all times, and outside when close to others, wash their hands often and properly, and practice social distancing. We will provide more details and resources on community safety standards as we get closer to the start of the year.

The following actions are part of UNCG’s Enhanced Cleaning Plan to help fight the spread of COVID-19:

  • Disinfect high-touch surfaces multiple times per day in public areas including door knobs/handles, elevator call buttons, door push-plates, stairway railings, etc. 
  • Use electrostatic spray disinfectant periodically in common areas or upon request.
  • Increase classroom surface cleaning and disinfection from daily to multiple times a day as allowed by class schedule.
  • Restroom disinfection will occur multiple times per day by adding disinfecting to normal bathroom checks.  
  • Increase use of machine-aided cleaning systems in heavily used restrooms.
  • Disinfecting wipes will also be available for faculty and staff to wipe down their office areas. 
  • Housekeeping will clean and disinfect offices on a weekly basis and could increase cleaning and disinfection of offices in cooperation with occupants and building contacts.

Shield Our Spartans
It will take all of us together to keep our community safe and healthy. The primary way COVID-19 spreads is through person-to-person contact, so our best hope of preventing its spread is by changing the way we behave. We will expect students to show care for their friends, peers, colleagues, and neighbors. This means students are required to wear face coverings when close to others, wash their hands often and properly, and practice social distancing. 

Will there be events held on campus?

To support the community safety standards we are putting in place, events will be extremely limited and subject to statewide limitations around crowd size. 

  • All summer events have been postponed or cancelled. 
  • A number of traditional campus events will be redesigned to facilitate social distancing and take advantage of technology to connect people – including UNCG Homecoming.
  • Conference and meeting facilities will have extremely limited access.
  • If you have planned an event or have an expectation for a traditional campus event, please be sure to check with your campus contact for updates. 
What video technology has been implemented to support online and hybrid learning at UNCG?

We have implemented the Panopto video platform in almost all of our technology-equipped learning spaces on the UNCG campus. Panopto can record multiple video sources, so the student sees the instructor as well as the instructor’s slide deck or document camera image. One of the primary advantages of Panopto is the ability to search and index specific terms or phrases, so the student can access content for just-in-time learning. Panopto easily integrates with Zoom, Canvas, and other tools currently used for remote learning.

What changes are planned for campus dining this fall?

Spartan Dining has implemented an operations plan to best serve our students, faculty, staff, and visitors whenever they eat on campus using the best guidance from the CDC and through consultation with the Guilford County Health Department who certifies all food operations in the county. These include, but are not limited to, the following changes and new approaches to serving our students safely:

  • We are making all efforts to provide customers with dining options for eat-in, pickup, and to-go options.
  • Fountain View Dining will be available to individuals with meal plan swipes only.
  • A new to-go dining location will open in Moran Commons to provide hot meals.
  • We are opening  a kiosk and mobile ordering service for meal pickup in retail locations.
  • Possible change to meal plans to accommodate more efficient and effective use of dining options.
  • All dining venues will have reduced capacity for seating. Right now capacity is being capped at 50%.
  • Significant reduction in or elimination of cash handling.
  • Additional Safety and Protective Equipment:
    • Every dining associate will receive a daily wellness check to include self-reported illnesses and a contactless temperature check.
    • Face coverings will be provided and expected to be worn at all times by associates.
    • Gloves will be worn when working with food.
    • Plexiglass shield barriers will be used at all registers and points of service.
    • In addition, guests will be expected to wear face coverings at all times except when eating.
  • Enhanced cleaning:
    • All dining team managers and food handlers have gone through specific COVID-19 ServSafe training.
    • Associates wash hands and change gloves every 30 minutes or less.
    • Associates are specifically designated to continuously clean tables, chairs, and all high-touch surfaces with sanitizer.
    • Hand sanitizer stations are available for guests to use at the entrances and exits and in the production areas for associates.
    • Back of house cleaning procedures will take place every 30 minutes. The culinary team will clean and sanitize surfaces and high-touch areas.
    • Restrooms will be sanitized every 30 minutes.
    • Upon closing each day, the team will disinfect each dining venue.
  • Social distancing protocols:
    • One-way traffic management to help guests navigate serving and seating areas.
    • Social distancing in the kitchens and other back of the house areas.
    • Floor decals and signs for guests to follow proper distancing and flow of service, as well as a complete guest communications package to explain the new safety measures.

Hours of operation and safety measure details: https://dineoncampus.com/uncg

What new cleaning protocols are being put in place across UNCG?

The following actions are part of UNCG’s Enhanced Cleaning Plan to help fight the spread of COVID-19:

  • Disinfect high-touch surfaces multiple times per day in public areas including door knobs/handles, elevator call buttons, door push-plates, stairway railings, etc. 
  • Use electrostatic spray disinfectant periodically in common areas or upon request.
  • Increase classroom surface cleaning and disinfection from daily to multiple times a day as allowed by class schedule.
  • Restroom disinfection will occur multiple times per day by adding disinfecting to normal bathroom checks.  
  • Increase use of machine-aided cleaning systems in heavily used restrooms.
  • Disinfecting wipes will also be available for faculty and staff to wipe down their office areas. 
  • Housekeeping will clean and disinfect offices on a weekly basis and could increase cleaning and disinfection of offices in cooperation with occupants and building contacts.
What changes are planned for campus transportation?

Parking Operations and Campus Access Management (POCAM) has instituted health and safety measures on all campus buses including:

  • Enhanced cleaning of vehicles and outfitting each bus with hand sanitizer. 
  • Requiring all occupants of buses to wear face coverings. 
  • Reducing bus capacity by 50% (10-15 passengers).
  • Reviewing routes for possible changes to allow for more efficient and effective travel times. 

Riders are encouraged to give themselves additional time for possible delays due to reduced capacity on buses. Instructors are encouraged to be flexible with students who may arrive a few minutes late to class. 

What about research activity for the fall semester?

Research activity is the lifeblood of academia, and our research teams are anxious to get back to their important work. We are addressing labs and other research spaces with great care to keep graduate students and supervising faculty on campus with as few disruptions as possible. Those of you involved in research should visit our Keep Researching website and reach out to your advising faculty directly to discuss plans for the fall.

What about Fall 2020 Study Abroad and international travel?

Study abroad for the Fall 2020 semester will be suspended.

The decision about whether to proceed with fall study abroad was a difficult one to reach. In the end, we took into careful consideration important factors including the elevated international travel warnings issued by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and the U.S. Department of State. We also considered the continued rise in COVID-19 related cases abroad, the related increased health, safety and risk concerns for our students, and the unreliable infrastructure capacity worldwide to respond to the pandemic.

Based on these considerations, the University has decided to suspend all undergraduate exchange programs for the fall term administered through the International Programs Center (IPC), and students have been notified by email.  In addition, all other international travel involving undergraduates has also been cancelled.

 We must place the health and safety of our students above all other considerations. Please know that the IPC will support the students and help them understand their options going forward. For some, deferring their exchange opportunities to the spring may still be an option even if it is unclear at this time what the landscape will be by then. Students who still have questions have been advised to reach out to their Study Abroad advisor for clarification.  

We made this decision over the summer so that our academic units would be in a better position to plan alternate academic opportunities for our students, and so that students would have more time to consider their options for fall courses.

As previously communicated, all student international travel (including experiential, study abroad and other group travel program) activities for the summer 2020 term are cancelled.

 We will continue to re-evaluate this travel policy and all related academic decisions as the COVID-19 pandemic unfolds. If you have any questions, feel free to send them to the IPC staff or to studyabroad@uncg.edu

In general, what are the enrollment requirements for international students (F-1 visa holders) in Fall 2020 based on the most recent SEVP update?

The guidance issued in the July 6 broadcast message from the Student Exchange and Visitor Program was rescinded on July 14, restoring the March temporary rule. We are awaiting new official guidance from SEVP at this time, and will update as new information is available. If you have any questions related to F-1 visa holders, please reach out to IPC at isss@uncg.edu.

Students who have been issued an “Initial Attendance” Form I-20 must enroll in a full course of study with at least one face-to-face/hybrid course this Fall if they plan to live in the U.S. and have their SEVIS record activated.

Continuing F-1 visa holders (including transferring directly from another U.S. institution or change of education level at UNCG) are allowed to be enrolled 100% online and remain in the U.S. while otherwise maintaining F-1 status. International students will need to enroll in a full course of study that contributes to the timely completion of their degree program, which typically consists of the following:

  1. Undergraduate students are required to be enrolled in at least 12 credit hours per semester. 
  2. Graduate students must generally be enrolled for at least 9 credit hours.

Some continuing F-1 students may be eligible to enroll for less than full-time or be considered full-time with fewer hours than stated above. If you believe you qualify for an exception to full time enrollment (outlined here) please contact IPC at isss@uncg.edu for further instructions as you will be required to complete the appropriate request in the ISSS Portal

For specific FAQ’s and resources for international students, visit https://international.uncg.edu/2020/07/13/faqs-for-f-1-visa-holders-related-to-fall-2020/.

FAQ with Student Health Services

What are the signs and symptoms of COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a respiratory illness. The most common symptoms are fever, chills, cough, and shortness of breath. There are also some individuals with COVID-19 experiencing a sore throat, fatigue, muscle aches, loss of taste and/or smell, nausea, and diarrhea. Recently, the CDC has listed runny nose and congestion as symptoms of coronavirus.

Note that even if you aren’t exhibiting any of these symptoms, you could be presymptomatic and infected with coronavirus, which makes you capable of infecting others.

What does presymptomatic mean?

When someone is presymptomatic, they are infected with the virus but have not developed any symptoms yet, and they can potentially pass the virus to another person, which is called presymptomatic spread. This has been particularly common with the younger generation and is thought to be a significant contributor to the spread of COVID-19.

I’m experiencing some symptoms that I think could be symptoms of coronavirus. When should I go see a healthcare provider and get tested?

First of all, if you feel sick, stay home unless you are going out to see a healthcare provider or to get tested.

Deciding when to get tested or to see a healthcare provider depends on the individual. For example, if you have a runny nose but are also prone to allergies this time of the year, try taking allergy medication and see if your symptoms get better in a couple days. 

Also, think about what you have been doing and if you have recently put yourself at risk of infection at any point. Have you been social distancing? Have you worn a face covering when around others? Have you been washing your hands? If you have been doing all of those things and practicing good hygiene, that makes the likelihood of having been exposed to the virus lower. In that case, the symptoms you are experiencing may more likely be that of allergies or a cold. 
If you haven’t necessarily been following social distancing measures or wearing a face covering as you should, and your symptoms are unusual and persist, talk to a healthcare provider or call the Student Health Center.

What preventative measures are UNCG taking to keep the community safe?

We have ensured that individuals have personal protective equipment and can maintain social distancing by making modifications in classrooms, dining areas, residence halls, etc. These modifications include:

  • Ensuring all in-person classes will be socially distanced, with all participants wearing face coverings.
  • Cleaning classrooms and hallways intensively and frequently. 
  • Maintaining social distancing in our shuttles on the way to and from classes. 
  • Managing traffic in hallways and staggering the way people enter and leave classrooms.
  • Providing other physical protections and barriers where appropriate, adding hand sanitizer stations, etc.
  • Providing face coverings to students and employees.
  • Requiring students, faculty, staff, and visitors to wear a face covering while indoors on campus and outdoors when social distancing cannot be maintained.
  • Changing the move-in process to a two-stage approach (a drop-off stage and a final move stage).
  • Adjusting guest visitation policy in residence halls to limit visitors.
  • Increasing cleaning in common areas of residence halls.
  • Reducing capacity at dining venues by 50%.
  • Creating new To Go dining locations.
  • Implementing significant new training and safety/cleaning protocols for  campus dining.
  • Reinforcing social distancing at each dining location.
  • Implementing a wide range of new cleaning protocols across our campus including more frequent cleaning of all spaces with a focus on common areas, frequently touched surfaces, and locations where the virus may be more likely to spread.
  • Redesigning a number of traditional campus events to facilitate social distancing and take advantage of technology to connect people.
  • Limiting access to conference and meeting facilities.
  • Enhanced cleaning of vehicles and outfitting each bus with hand sanitizer. 
  • Requiring all occupants of buses to wear face coverings. 
  • Reducing bus capacity by 50% (10-15 passengers).
  • Reviewing routes for possible changes to allow for more efficient and effective travel times. 
  • Designating quarantine and isolation facilities

In addition, all students and employees are to monitor themselves for symptoms prior to coming to work or the classroom. Student Health Services is providing students with telemedicine services to reduce the potential for exposure during in-person office visits. Testing is available for students through Student Health Services and for employees through their health care provider and community-based clinics. Students and employees are asked to use a self-reporting tool if they are ill and/or have been tested. These self-reports feed into a case tracking tool to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the contact tracing and case management process. 

How can students, faculty, and staff do their part in protecting themselves and others?

Campus community members should adhere to all protocols, not just one or two. This means wearing your mask inside, practicing social distancing, not congregating in groups, practicing proper hand hygiene, and staying home when you are sick – this is not the time to power through classes if you feel ill because you’re putting yourself and potentially others at risk.

Remember to Wear, Wash, and Wait. This includes:

  • Wash your hands for 20 seconds with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid close contact with people by remaining six feet apart.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others.
  • Cover your cough with a tissue or sneeze/cough into your elbow.
  • Do not share food.
  • Disinfect frequently touched objects using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Stay home when you are sick and avoid close contact with those who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

Keep in mind the campus community as a whole, and the culture of care needed to have a successful semester. You’re not just protecting yourself when you follow the protocols, you’re protecting others. Similarly, if you don’t follow the protocols, you not only put yourself at risk, you put other Spartans at risk who may be more vulnerable than you.

How can students make an appointment and get tested at the Student Health Center?

The Student Health Center is discouraging walk-ins and seeing students by appointment only. This is so we can screen individuals to ensure they get the appropriate care, and so we can prepare for their arrival.

We are only testing individuals who are experiencing symptoms consistent with coronavirus on a case-by-case basis. The symptoms of coronavirus are common to many different illnesses such as allergies and strep throat, so when a student calls or schedules a telehealth virtual appointment and describes their symptoms, the provider will then decide how to proceed.

If a provider determines that an individual does need to be tested, an appointment will be made. Upon arrival, the individual can check in remotely on their phone. We will then call you into the center for testing. We are using rapid testing, and the results are received while you are in the office.

 If the test results are negative, we do a more thorough backup test to be sure. Both the rapid test and backup test are nose swabs. The backup test results can take several days to come back. During that time, you are expected to isolate yourself and go home. 

If the test results are positive, you will be expected to isolate yourself and go home. If you cannot go home, UNCG will assist you in relocating to one of the designated quarantine and isolation facilities on campus.

Am I at a high risk for contracting coronavirus?

Public health officials have identified people as “high-risk” for contracting COVID-19 and experiencing greater complications as those who meet any of the following criteria or who may care for someone with any of the following criteria:  

  • are over 65 years of age,  
  • have underlying health conditions including heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease, or diabetes,  
  • are pregnant, and/or  
  • have weakened immune systems. 

FAQ for Work on Campus

How long does COVID-19 survive on surfaces?

Research as of April 16, 2020 from the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that the virus can survive up to 72 hours on some surfaces, including plastic and cardboard, but in most instances, the risk of infection resulting from contact with a contaminated surface is unlikely after a few days.  

What about handling objects that could contain the virus, such as mail and paper?

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.  Use good hand hygiene and avoid touching your face to reduce the risk.

Are face coverings required on campus?

Employees are required to wear a face covering that covers the nose and mouth whenever they are inside, or outside and unable to maintain a minimum of six feet of physical distancing, and when interacting with or near others such as in hallways, stairwells, elevators, restrooms, kitchens and when sharing a vehicle and/or riding a Spartan Chariot.

Will face coverings be provided for employees on campus?

Yes, departments will be supplied with face coverings for their employees, upon request, through the Veoci system.  

Can I reuse a paper face covering?

Yes, Paper face coverings may be used for days to weeks, depending on the level of use.   

  • Do not attempt to wash or use disinfectant chemicals on a paper face coverings. 
  • Store face coverings in a clean, dry location between uses.
  • Replace face coverings when they become dirty, worn, or restrictive to air flow.
Am I able to bring a face covering from home?

Employees may bring homemade face coverings that cover the mouth and nose if they meet the guidance outlined by the CDC.

Can I hang curtains or install a baffle from the ceiling to the top of my cubicle, essentially enclosing it?

Unfortunately, code does not allow fabric to be suspended from the ceiling, ceiling tiles, or ceiling grid.  Fire can accelerate very quickly with their vertical placement. Material such as plexiglass or plywood cannot be installed either.  These can block water flow from a sprinkler head as well as create an incredible amount of smoke and heat in a fire.

Can I cordon off an area, restricting access?

Please contact safety@uncg.edu or call 336-334-4357 for assistance in this matter.  

I need to move some furniture.  Can I place them out of the way in the hall, stairwell, etc.?

Generally, the answer is no.  Most of these areas are constructed to the minimum fire code dimensions and cannot be obstructed.  If you believe the corridor or alcove in question may be wider than the minimum egress requirements, please contact safety@uncg.edu or call 336-334-4357 for assistance in this matter.

Can I prop a door open?

First determine if it is a Fire Door.

Do so by opening the door and looking on the hinge side for a small, vertical label that will indicate if the door is fire rated for a certain length of time.  There are different styles of labels and it may look different than the one in the picture.  Most of these doors will also have an automatic door closer as well. 

Doors that are attached to a Magnetic Hold Open are typically fire rated doors and are allowed to be held open since the magnet drops with fire alarm activation.

If it is a Fire Door, no, you cannot prop it open. If it is not a Fire Door, yes, you can prop it open.

fire door
Example of a Fire Door label
Can I attach a sign to a door?

If it is a Fire Door, no, you cannot attach a sign to the door. If it is not a Fire Door, yes, you can attach a sign to the door.

Can I turn a door that latches into one that can be pushed open?

If it is a Fire Door, no, you cannot. If it is not a Fire Door, yes, you can.